Cherry angioma pregnancy

After pregnancy, the mother may develop cherry angiomas due to rapid formation of new blood vessels. A cherry angioma can be differentiated from a mole of pimple by the following symptoms. It is a bright red or a deep, as opposed to the brownish colour of a mole.

It is also known as senile Angiomas and Campbell de Morgan Spots, are a type of skin growth which appear like a pimple but can be on any part of the body and are permanent once that appear.

Generally, they appear on shoulders, upper arms or around the midriff. Females of age 30 years o above are most susceptible to growth of cherry angiomas on their body. Although most cherry angiomas appear as small red dots and can easily blend in with fair skin. Some can be bigger in size and appear to be like a lesion. They are not harmful and generally do not need medical attention unless they start bleeding.

CAUSES

The exact cause for the appearance of cherry angiomas is as yet unknown. However, research has shown that people having these red spots usually have a family history of them, i.e. it appears to harmful chemicals, polluted air, etc. can also cause these spots to appear. Sometimes, after a pregnancy, the mother may develop cherry angiomas due to rapid formation of new blood vessels.

SYMPTOMS

A cherry angioma can be differentiated from a mole of pimple by the following symptoms:

  1. It is a bright red or a deep red, as opposed to the brownish colour of a mole.
  2. If it is small, it can be smooth but the bigger ones tend to stick out from the skin.
  3. It is usually less than half a centimetre n a diameter but can grow bigger with an age.

SIGNS

Juts like moles, cherry angiomas also just seem to appear out of nowhere. You might look down in the mirror some day and notice a small red dot which was not there before. Cherry angiomas do not pain or itch so it is difficult to notice when it is going to appear. But if you notice small red dots on your body which grow larger over the years, you can reasonably sure they are cherry angiomas.

TESTS

A doctor can easily identify cherry angiomas by visual inspection due to its unique symptoms. In 99 percent cases no tests is conducted before diagnosis. However, sometimes, a skin biopsy may be done confirm. A biopsy involves taking small samples of the skin and studying it under a microscope.

DIAGNOSIS

The first step to diagnosis is a physical examination of these red spots. At most, a doctor may examine them under a magnifying glass. Cherry angioma is known to be a genetic disease. A skin biopsy may be carried out in very rare cases before the final diagnosis.